Fall 2017 Workshops

The Delta Program and the CIRTL Newtork host a variety of workshops to help participants with their professional development around teaching and learning. These workshops require registration. Everyone from graduate students to faculty is welcome to attend.

» Pulling It All Together: Crafting Your CV/Resume and Cover Letter
» Teaching Philosophy Workshop
» NSF GRFP Workshop: How to Address the Broader Impact in Your Fellowship Application
» Pre-Internship Workshop Series
» Creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP) Co-sponsored by the Graduate School Office of Professional Development
» Qualitative Research Primer: Using Narrative Data in Your Teaching-as-Research Project
» 5 Things To Do on the First and Last Day of Class
» Finding and Evaluating Educational Literature
» Integrating Civic Learning into the STEM Classroom
» Did Your Students Learn What You Wanted Them To? Writing Measurable Learning Outcomes
» Introduction to STEM Project Based Learning
» Leveraging Open Source Principles and Resources for Teaching and Learning in STEM
» Has Someone Else Wrestled with This Before? Using the Educational Research Literature and Web-Based Resources to Inform Your Teaching
» Developing Your Research Program at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution: A panel and workshop
» Teaching Inclusively

Pulling It All Together: Crafting Your CV/Resume and Cover Letter

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

9:00-10:30 a.m.
Union South, TITU

Facilitator: Don Gillian-Daniel, Delta Program

Registration closed.

 

In developing your written credentials and preparing application materials for your job search, it is crucial to represent your professional experience, accomplishments, expertise, and professional development experiences in the most impactful manner possible. Participants are asked to bring a hard copy of their CV/resume or a job application letter to this workshop. Join us and learn how to write your way into an interview!


Teaching Philosophy Workshop

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

9:00-11:00 a.m.
Union South, TITU

Facilitator: Jessica Maher, Delta Program

Registration closed.

 

This workshop is designed to help participants develop their teaching philosophy. This document is a common component of faculty job application materials, and yet can prove challenging to write. Through hands-on exercises and constructive peer feedback, participants will leave with material for a draft of their teaching statement. You do not need to have a prior draft of your statement in order to participate in the workshop.


NSF GRFP Workshop: How to Address the Broader Impact in Your Fellowship Application

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

9:00-11:00 a.m.

H.F. DeLuca Forum, Discovery Building

Workshop leaders: Trina McMahon (Civil and Environmental Engineering), Kevin Niemi (WISCIENCE), Irina Diaz (UW-Madison Graduate School), Don Gillian-Daniel (Delta Program)

Registration closed.


The National Science Foundation (NSF) employs two criteria in the review of Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) applications, namely intellectual merit and broader impact. Experience shows that while most applicants have little difficulty responding to the criterion relating to intellectual merit, many struggle to frame the broader impacts of the activities they propose to undertake. To address the broader impacts, applications are expected to include ways in which activities and projects will advance discovery and understanding, broaden the participation of underrepresented groups, enhance the infrastructure for research and education, and ultimately benefit society. This workshop is designed to help you address the concept of broader impacts in your fellowship application, and specifically is a time for you to discuss strategies for writing a successful broader impact plan, hear from panelists about successful fellowship proposals, and learn about resources on campus focused on effective integration of research and education.

 

NSF GRFP Workshop: How to Address the Broader Impact in Your Fellowship Application | 10.4.17 from Discovery Building on Vimeo.

 

Supplemental Workshop Materials:

PDF Delta Broader Impacts Workshop Presentation 2017

PDF NSF GRFP Programs to Leverage

PDF Delta Broader Impacts Workshop Delta Overview Presentation 2016
UW Madison Resources for Broader Impacts


Pre-Internship Workshop Series

The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers practical experience to develop their skills and interests in teaching and learning. Each semester, the internship program supports a diverse cohort of interns who partner with faculty and staff to complete a teaching-as-research project. This 2-part workshop series is intended to prepare students to engage in an internship project in the following semester. The second workshop in the series is a required part of the internship. If you have any questions about the Delta Internship Program or the Pre-Internship Workshop, contact Devin Wixon at wixon@wisc.edu.

 

Pre-Internship Workshop I: Finding a Project

Open to all graduate students and postdocs

Monday, October 9, 2017

9:30-11:00 a.m.

445 Henry Mall, Room 117 (WISCIENCE)

Registration closed.

Attendees will discuss the internship process and timeline, as well as potential internship projects and partners. This session is for students who do not yet have a specific project or partner in mind.

 

Pre-Internship Workshop II: Developing Your Project

Required for those planning to complete their Delta internship project in Spring 2018.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

9:00 am-12:00 p.m.

Union South, TITU

Registration closed.

Attendees will define their internship project, develop their project plan, explore available resources, and learn more about the university's institutional review board (IRB) process that facilitates responsible research. The internship pre-requisite is one semester-long Delta or other approved course in teaching and learning, which can be taken over the summer, locally, or online. This session is for participants who have a specific project and partner planned. If you are joining the subsequent semester cohort and can't make this workshop time, please email Devin at wixon@wisc.edu for an alternative time.

Supplemental Workshop Materials:

Delta Internship Guidebook (PDF)


Creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP)

Co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Graduate School Office of Professional Development and Delta Program.

Date: Thursday, November 9, 2017

Time: 4:30-6:00 p.m.

Location: Union South (TITU)

Registration closed.

 

An individual development plan (IDP) encourages you to think about what you need to do next – and over the next few years – to achieve your goals. We will discuss how to define achievable goals, identify resources, and develop strategies for implementing and sustaining your plans. Participants will begin creating a personalized plan, taking into account career interests and addressing the development of knowledge and skills for professional growth. Registration is required.


Qualitative Research Primer: Using Narrative Data in Your Teaching-as-Research Project

Date: Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Time: 3:30-5:30 p.m.

Location: online in Blackboard Collaborate

Registration will take place from Sept. 18-Oct. 2. To register click HERE (you will be prompted to create a CIRTL account if you do not already have one).

 

Teaching-as-Research involves taking a deliberate and systematic approach to investigating, reflecting on, and improving one’s own teaching. Some of the best information about your teaching and its impact on student learning can come from the words of students themselves (such as responses to surveys, in-class writing prompts, or exam questions). If you come from a research tradition that emphasizes quantitative data, as is the case in many STEM disciplines, you may not know where to start in analyzing and interpreting the narrative data provided by your students’ writing.

 

This workshop is designed for participants from quantitative research backgrounds who are working on a Teaching-as-Research project (in the planning, implementation, or analysis phase), who have collected or have plans to collect narrative data, and are unsure how to go about analyzing such data. This workshop will provide a brief overview of qualitative research methods, elucidate the differences between quantitative and qualitative research, and introduce the iterative process of coding narrative data. Participants will work on coding narrative data individually and in teams, and formulate a plan for using what they have learned in their Teaching-as-Research project.

 

After completing both sessions of this workshop, learners will have the skills and abilities to:

• Describe qualitative approaches to research and how they differ from quantitative approaches

• Identify and articulate research contexts in which qualitative approaches are appropriate and well-suited

• Identify and describe data collection methods in qualitative research designs

• Conduct preliminary coding of narrative data

• Formulate and articulate preliminary results based on initial coding


5 Things To Do on the First and Last Day of Class

Date(s): Thursday, October 19 and November 16 (participants are expected to attend both sessions)

Time: 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Location: online in Blackboard Collaborate

Registration will take place from Sept. 25-Oct. 9. To register click HERE (you will be prompted to create a CIRTL account if you do not already have one).

 

This two-part workshop will focus on two critical, but often overlooked, class days: the first and the last day. How can you use these important days to their maximum potential?

 

Part 1: The First Day You never get a second chance to make a first impression. In fact, studies show that student ultimate opinions of a course are often formed on the first day. So how can you use that time to your advantage and set the right tone for the rest of the semester? (You weren't just going to read the syllabus to them, were you?) In the first part of this workshop, we will discuss five things that should be part of your first day lesson plans.

 

Part 2: The Last Day By the end of the semester, we are all exhausted and overworked. How can we end the semester with the same enthusiasm that we had at the beginning? This portion of the workshop will present five things that you can do on the last day of class to help students reflect on their learning, the course content, and their successes.


Finding and Evaluating Educational Literature

Date(s): Friday, October 20 and October 27 (participants are expected to attend both sessions)

Time: 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Location: online in Blackboard Collaborate

Registration will take place from Sept. 25-Oct. 9. To register click HERE (you will be prompted to create a CIRTL account if you do not already have one).

 

The goal for this workshop is to help students identify where and how to look for educational literature, and critically evaluate the information they find. Strategies for searching academic databases, as well as free online resources will be explored, and participants will learn how to examine and analyze their sources for appropriateness to their research projects.


Integrating Civic Learning into the STEM Classroom

Date(s): Thursday, November 2 and November 9 (participants are expected to attend both sessions)

Time: 1:30-3:00 p.m.
Location: online in Blackboard Collaborate

Registration will take place from Oct. 9-Oct. 23. To register click HERE (you will be prompted to create a CIRTL account if you do not already have one).

 

Civic learning and engagement is a form of integrative learning that intentionally prepares students for informed and engaged participation in the community. Intentional design of civic learning experiences provides opportunities for students to develop civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions through learning, inquiry and practice. Contrary to traditional views, the new civics is not limited to fields like political science and communication; rather civic learning and engagement are critical to 21st century scientific literacy and public problem solving. This two-session workshop will introduce national work on civic learning and engagement, with a particular emphasis on applications for the STEM classroom. During our time together, participants will identify and discuss relevant conceptual frameworks, draft a civic learning goal and sketch out the design of an assignment that integrates a civic learning and STEM learning goal.


Did Your Students Learn What You Wanted Them To? Writing Measurable Learning Outcomes

Date: Wednesday, November 8

Time: 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Location: 1025 Engineering Centers Building

Registration closed.

 

Effective, adjective: Successful in producing a desired or intended result. Being an effective teacher means asking how your student learning and experiences met the teaching goals, which starts with measurable, student-centered learning outcomes. These are often challenging to write, yet should be the starting point of any teaching. Participants will need to bring learning outcomes related to teaching they are currently or will soon be doing. Learning outcomes are part of the teaching-as-research process, and this workshop is highly recommended for those considering a Delta internship.
Learning outcome: Create realistic well-defined, achievable, measurable and student-centered learning goals for any teaching experience.


Introduction to STEM Project Based Learning

Date(s): Thursday, November 9 and November 16 (participants are expected to attend both sessions)

Time: 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Location: online in Blackboard Collaborate

Registration will take place from Oct. 16-Oct. 30. To register click HERE (you will be prompted to create a CIRTL account if you do not already have one).

 

Project based learning (PBL) is an instructional strategy whereby students gain knowledge as they work towards a well-defined product. In this online workshop, we will discuss how STEM PBL supports students’ attainment of content knowledge and development of critical analysis and reasoning skills by working to respond to an authentic and complex problem. As a group, we will discuss the value of integrated and multi-disciplinary collaborations in STEM PBLs, the 5E Model of Instruction as it is situated in the context of a STEM project-based learning activity, and the construction of an ill-defined task and well-defined outcomes. Deliverables from the workshop will include the Instructor PBL Checklist which provides a framework for the design of a PBL. Participants will complete the workshop with an actionable outline of a PBL in their disciplines.


Leveraging Open Source Principles and Resources for Teaching and Learning in STEM

Date(s): Friday, November 10 and November 17 (participants are expected to attend both sessions)

Time: 1:00-3:00 p.m.
Location: online in Blackboard Collaborate

Registration will take place from Oct. 16-Oct. 30. To register click HERE (you will be prompted to create a CIRTL account if you do not already have one).

 

Free and open source software (FOSS) has become a linchpin to many of the most advanced technologies to arise in the past two decades. The principles and practices behind the success of open source software has made its way into non-software contexts and education should be no different. In this workshop we will explore the direct use of open source software and the power it can bring to education along with how open source principles can be applied in a learning environment. Here we will focus on the use of Jupyter notebooks both in and out of the classroom and the use of GitHub as a learning platform promoting collaboration and exposing students to ideas such as version control and peer review. We will also discuss using open source educational materials and what advantages and disadvantages these might bring. The workshop will include demonstrations, hands-on activities, and in the second session a show-and-tell to discuss what participants were able to do between sessions.


Has Someone Else Wrestled with This Before? Using the Educational Research Literature and Web-Based Resources to Inform Your Teaching

Date: Monday, November 20

Time: 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Location: 1360 Genetics Biotechnology Center

Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4VdNk4OmwHb0Wqh

 

Teaching shouldn't always reinvent the wheel: Many others have considered and addressed challenges in student learning and can inform your teaching. This workshop will cover where to search, what search terms to use, what types of questions to ask. Participants will need to bring a laptop or tablet, as well as a learning challenge or question they are interested in, such as the best practices for an activity they are considering, finding an assessment for a course unit they're teaching, or why a particular concept seems so challenging. Using the educational research literature is part of the teaching-as-research process, and this workshop is highly recommended for those considering a Delta internship.
Learning outcome: Find and critically consider the literature and existing knowledge associated with a teaching experience.


Developing Your Research Program at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution: A panel and workshop

Date(s): Wednesday, November 29

Time: 4:30-6:00 p.m.
Location: Tong Auditorium, 1003 Engineering Centers Building

Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cT6yR6wCZ9DHWuN

 

Are you considering a faculty position at a primarily undergraduate institution (PUI)? PUIs, which include community and technical colleges, liberal arts colleges, and comprehensive universities, are often defined by their strong teaching mission. However, for many faculty at PUIs, research and scholarly activity is an important part of the job as well. To be a successful faculty candidate at a PUI, you will need to consider how to develop your own research program at that institution, which offers a different set of opportunities than a research-intensive university. In this event, a panel of STEM faculty from local PUIs will discuss models for successful research activity at their institutions, and how they developed their own research programs within that context. You will then have the opportunity to workshop your own research interests, identifying the ways in which you might develop a successful research program for a PUI. Light refreshments will be provided.

Panelists:

Christen Smith, Chemistry, Madison College

Zachary Pratt, Biological Sciences, Edgewood College

Catherine Chan, Biological Sciences and Chemisty, UW-Whitewater


Teaching Inclusively

Date(s): Tuesday, December 5

Time: 1:00-3:00 p.m.
Location: online in Blackboard Collaborate

Registration will take place from Nov. 6-Nov. 27. To register click HERE (you will be prompted to create a CIRTL account if you do not already have one).

 

As student demographics become more diverse, incidents of race and racism, privilege and power regularly impact undergraduates on our campuses. Without training, knowing how to address these inequities effectively can be uncomfortable and challenging. This workshop is designed to build your confidence in dealing with “hot moments” or “difficult discussions” in the classroom by giving you practice navigating these situations. Participants will: (1) to explore the perspectives of underrepresented and minoritized students on our campuses, (2) discuss a framework for addressing hot moments and difficult discussions in the classroom, and (3) practice what to say during these hot moments or difficult discussions. The emphasis in the session is on saying, deconstructing conversations and receiving feedback.