Fall 2015 Offerings

The Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning is pleased to offer the following courses and programs for the upcoming fall semester. Review all the courses below and sign up by clicking on the registration link next to each course description. Some courses can be taken for credit. Please keep in mind that space is limited and registrations will be processed in the order in which they are received. We will regularly update this page with additional course information and registration links. All courses are designed to introduce participants to the foundations of teaching and learning. Different courses approach teaching from distinct angles such as teaching with technology and teaching in an internationally diverse classroom but can be taken in any order.

» Teaching in Science and Engineering: The College Classroom
» Teaching in Science and Engineering: The College Classroom (International Students, International Faculty)
» Informal Education: Engage Children in After-School Science Clubs
» Internship Seminar
» Research Mentor Training Seminar (graduate student and postdoc section)
» Effective Teaching with Technology
» Improv to Improve Teaching and Communication
» Diversity in the College Classroom
» Expeditions in Learning: Community-Based Learning
» Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL) Courses

Teaching in Science and Engineering: The College Classroom

Registration closed.

Instructor: Rosemary Russ
Days and times: Mondays, 12:302:30 p.m.
Location: 229 Teacher Education

Credit Information: 2 credits (EPD 654)
In this course, you will gain knowledge on the basics of learning theory and effective teaching methods so you can operate at the forefront of ideas in college education. You will explore your teaching philosophy and how it will impact your future classes, design a course curriculum, engage in micro-teaching, and learn how to monitor and investigate the effectiveness of a learning environment.

Teaching in Science and Engineering: The College Classroom (International Students, International Faculty)

Registration closed.

Instructor: Michel Wattiaux (CALS faculty tenured on the basis of Excellence in Teaching)

Days and times: Fridays, 10 a.m. –12 p.m.

Location: 1143 Mechanical Engineering

Credit Information: 2 units (EPD 690 or Dairy Sci 875)

Do you wish to become an effective math, engineering, or science instructor, with a deep understanding of how to use international diversity as an asset rather than a liability in your classroom? If so, this course is for you, whether you are a US-born or international graduate student or post-doc. In this course, you will learn the core skills of effective and savvy teachers who can use global perspectives, varied modes of instruction, and differences in students' expectations as tools to increase the learning of every student in their classes.


In essence, this course focuses on the challenges posed by teaching an increasingly diverse student population. Although the course places an emphasis on international instructors and international students, it is not as much about studying cultural, racial and social views as it is to learn how to take advantage of the unique perspectives of each student in our classes to engage them fully in the course content. By the end of the semester, participants who have fully engaged in the activities of this course will have gained knowledge, understanding and hands-on practical skills in creating college courses designed as effective learning environments for their students. This is a discussion-based course modeled after what is now known as "flipped-classroom" and "blended learning." For more information, see: https://dairynutrient.wisc.edu/isif/ 

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Informal Science Education: Engage Children in After-School Science Clubs

Registration closed.

Instructor: Dolly Ledin (Institute for Biology Education)

Days and times: Wednesdays, 5:30–7 p.m.

Location: DeLuca Biochemistry Building, Room 1116

Credit Information: 2 units (BIO 375)

UW–Madison undergraduate and graduate students in the sciences have interest, enthusiasm and expertise in many diverse areas of science, from biology to engineering. Many of them have a sincere interest in sharing their enthusiasm and knowledge with younger students but do not have the tools to do so. Though they have adequate scientific background, they need to learn about the learning process, the needs and learning styles of children, techniques for engaging young people in the process of science, means of evaluating informal learning experiences, and techniques for reflecting on their own learning from community service experiences. This course provides them content information, hands-on experiences, and opportunities for dialogue and reflective practices directly connected to their experience in leading an After School Science Club. The course is part of the Adult Role Models in Science (ARMS) program, a partnership program with the goal of enhancing science education in elementary and middle schools. This course is offered through the Institute for Biology Education. The course requires a one-year commitment to the after-school clubs and is a 2 semester sequence. After-school clubs are located within the Madison community. For more information see: http://biology.wisc.edu/EngageChildren.htm

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Internship Seminar

Registration closed.

Instructor: Devin Wixon

Days and times: Thursdays, 12:00–1:30 p.m.

Location: TBD

Credit Information: 1 credit (ELPA 502)

The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers the opportunity to develop teaching and learning skills in real-world situations. Each semester, the Delta Program supports a new cohort of interns who partner with faculty and staff to improve teaching and learning environments through innovative Teaching-As-Research projects. Interns enroll in this seminar during the semester in which they are implementing their internship project, and use the time to present their projects to their peers who provide constructive feedback in real-time. Enrollment is limited to only those students who have taken a prior Delta course and have applied for and been admitted into the internship program. Visit the Delta Internship Program website for more information.

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Research Mentor Training Seminar (graduate student and postdoc section)

Registration closed.

Instructors: Andrew Greenberg (Chemical and Biological Engineering)

Days and times: Tuesdays, 1:20–2:10 p.m.

Location: Engineering Hall, Room 2341

Credit Information: 2 units (CBE 562). Counts toward the Learning Community requirement for the Delta Certificate.

The Research Mentor Training Seminar is designed to help graduate students and postdocs become effective research mentors. Seminar discussions focus on different mentoring styles and strategies for developing confidence, independence, creativity, and communication skills in your current and future mentees. The mentor training seminar consists of weekly one-hour sessions in which participants address issues in mentoring through facilitated discussions based on collaboration and collective problem solving. Participants will read articles and case studies, write biographies of their mentees, compare their goals with those of their mentees, explore time-management strategies, and write mentoring philosophies. This is a terrific opportunity for new mentors to get off on the right foot, and for experienced mentors to share their wisdom. For more information about the Research Mentor Training Seminar please contact Christine Pfund at cepfund@wisc.edu.

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Effective Teaching with Technology

Registration closed.

Instructors: John Martin, Jake Blanchard, Greg Moses

Days and times: Mondays, 1:00-3:00 p.m.

Location: 2121 Mechanical Engineering

Credit Information: 2 units (EPD 690-003)

Effective Teaching with Technology will help you develop new approaches to the effective use of instructional technology in your teaching practice. You will learn how technological choices can affect the learning of today's diverse student populations. In addition to several mini projects, you will complete a Teaching-as-Research project to study how technology can affect student learning in your discipline. This course is designed for graduate students and postdocs who desire to explore the potential of new instructional tools and methods to improve their teaching practice. The goals of the class are to: 1) provide foundational knowledge for choosing appropriate technological tools for specific learning situations, 2) provide active learning experiences through class sessions and independent projects in the effective use of learning technologies including interactive web applications, multimedia enhanced lectures, social media and course management tools, and 3) promote the importance and scholarship of the evaluation of instructional technology efficacy.

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Improv to Improve Teaching and Communication

Registration closed.

Instructors: Ben Taylor

Days and times: Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 p.m.

Location: Mechanical Engineering, Room 1164

Credit Information: 2 units (EPD 690)

Using the storytelling and character-development techniques of theatrical improvisation, participants will build confidence, teamwork, leadership, listening and decision-making skills through the performance of short games and scenes. Participants will be able to better think on their feet, manage a constructivist classroom, and communicate science more effectively to both technical and non-technical audiences. Each session will be comprehensive, diverse, and dynamic (in addition to being a lot of fun), and will build on the skills from the week before. Due to the sequential nature of the class and the necessity of building a supportive learning community, please defer taking the course if you know in advance that your schedule will require you to miss more than two classes.

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Diversity in the College Classroom

Registration closed.

Instructors: Maya Holtzman and Amihan Huesmann

Days and times: Mondays, 4:30-6:00 p.m.

Location: TBD

Credit Information: 2 units (EPD 690-004)

This course is designed for graduate students and postdocs who are interested in exploring how diversity impacts their teaching and student learning. Graduate students, postdocs, and faculty are recognizing that how we teach differentially impacts the success of all our students. Participants in this course will consider the complexities of diversity, critically reflect on the impact of their current teaching, mentoring, and advising methods, and explore the ways in which they might implement the principles of Inclusive Excellence and High Impact Practices to effectively support the learning and development of the diverse students in their classes and laboratories.  Participants will also create a diversity-focused plan of action for their future practice.

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Expeditions in Learning: Community-Based Learning

Registration closed.

Instructors: Elizabeth Tryon and Haley Madden

Days and times: Thursdays 3:30-5:00 p.m. (course runs from Sept. 10 to Dec. 10)

Location: Library in the Morgridge Center for Public Service; 154 Red Gym, 716 Langdon St.

Credit Information: 1 credit (CP 620). Counts toward the Learning Community requirement for the Delta Certificate.

Service-learning and Community-Based Research, collectively known as Community-Based Learning (CBL), is an instructional strategy that connects classroom learning to community engagement, fosters civic responsibility, and enhances academic achievement. In this section of EL, staff from the Morgridge Center for Public Service will explore the pedagogy, principles and best practices for CBL. Expeditions across campus and into the community will provide you with an opportunity to observe CBL in action.

Expeditions in Learning is founded on a collaborative and experiential learning model. The program is designed to take advantage of campus learning opportunities that are new or unique to many, and provide "programmatic permission" and supportive colleagues for you to go places you have never gone before as you explore campus, observe diverse classroom settings, and engage ideas in a new way. Several expeditions (or mini-field trips) are included throughout the semester. They are supplemented by small-group discussions, which are intended to connect your expeditions to your teaching and provide a space to learn from others about their diverse experiences.

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Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL) Courses

Teaching with Technology
Sept. 8 - Oct. 27, 2015
Weekly Tuesday meetings; 2:00-3:30 pm
Credit information: 1 unit

 

Developing a Teaching Portfolio
Sept. 16 - Nov. 18, 2015
Two synchronous meetings on Sept. 16 and Nov. 18; 2:00-4:00 pm
Credit information: 2 units

 

Diversity in the College Classroom
Sept. 14 - Nov. 9, 2015
Weekly Monday meetings; 1:00-2:30 pm

Credit information: 1 unit

 

Service-Learning in STEM Classrooms: Intruduction to Pegagogy and Practice
Sept. 15 - Nov. 3, 2015

Weekly Tuesday meetings; 1:00-3:00 pm

Credit information: 1 unit

 

Creating Assessments and Evaluation Plans (Short Course)
Sept. 10 - Dec. 3, 2015

Biweekly Thursday meetings; 1:00-2:00 pm

Credit information: Not available for credit

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An Introduction to Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching

“An Introduction to Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching” is an open, online course designed to provide future STEM faculty, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows with an introduction to effective teaching strategies and the research that supports them.  The goal of the eight-week course is to equip the next generation of STEM faculty to be effective teachers, thus improving the learning experience for the thousands of students they will teach.

 

Days: September 28-November 20, 2015

Register online: https://www.coursera.org/course/stemteaching

“An Introduction to Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching” is an open, online course designed to provide future STEM faculty, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows with an introduction to effective teaching strategies and the research that supports them.  The goal of the eight-week course is to equip the next generation of STEM faculty to be effective teachers, thus improving the learning experience for the thousands of students they will teach.

 

MOOC-Centered Learning Community (MCLC)

Register for the Mooc-Centered Learning Community through the Delta Program: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_diG7RSnO2PxSh2l
The Delta Program will host local discussion groups that will meet once a week for the duration of the course. Dates and times will be determined based on participant availability as specified in the registration form. This learning community will meet to discuss in greater depth the topics brought up in the course and are encouraged to share ideas and perspectives from their local groups with the global learning community created by the course. Register online for the MCLC:

 

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