Spring 2013 Offerings

The Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning is pleased to offer the following courses and programs for the spring semester. At this time, some course details are being finalized. Registration is now closed for all spring 2013 classes. Please contact Chris Pfund for any additional inquiries at cepfund@wisc.edu.

Diversity in the College Classroom: Bridging the Achievement Gap
Effective Teaching with Technology
Expeditions in Learning: Exploring How Students Learn with Writing Across the Curriculum
Expeditions in Learning: The First-Year Experience
Informal Education: Engage Children in Science (after-school science clubs)
Informal Education: A Practicum for Scientists
Instructional Materials Development: Flipping the Classroom
Internship Seminar
Teaching Sociology
Teaching Statistics

Diversity in the College Classroom: Bridging the Achievement Gap

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructors: Don Gillian-Daniel (Delta Program), Gina Spitz (Sociology)
Time: Fridays, 11:30am-1:00pm
Location: Union South, TITU (most class sessions)
The Bridging the Achievement Gap project is designed to take a systematic, Teaching-as-Research-based approach toward addressing the achievement gap that separates under-represented minority students from their peers, particularly in courses that serve as gateways to various majors. In this special section of the Delta Program’s Diversity in the College Classroom course, graduate students and postdocs will come together to raise their awareness of core achievement gap issues and move toward appropriate evidence-based action. Opportunities will be presented to work with faculty and staff who are also engaged with the university’s achievement gap project. Students taking this course will be expected to partner with faculty and staff from the Creating a Collaborative Learning Environment: Bridging the Achievement Gap facilitated discussion group to design, develop, conduct, and evaluate Teaching-As-Research projects during the fall 2013 semester. This experience will introduce or build on existing curricular reform in the courses in which those faculty and staff teach. By making the year-long commitment to this project, students will complete two requirements toward the Delta Certificate in Research, Teaching, and Learning.
Credit Information: 2 credits

Effective Teaching with Technology

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructors: Jake Blanchard (Engineering Physics), Les Howles (DoIT Academic Technology)
Time: Fridays, 8–10 a.m.
Location: WisCEL Wendt Commons
Effective Teaching with Technology will help you develop new approaches to the effective use of instructional technology in your teaching practice. You will learn how technological choices can affect the learning of today's diverse student populations. In addition to several mini projects, you will complete a Teaching-as-Research project to study how technology can affect student learning in your discipline. This course is designed for graduate students and postdocs who desire to explore the potential of new instructional tools and methods to improve their teaching practice. The goals of the class are to: 1) provide foundational knowledge for choosing appropriate technological tools for specific learning situations, 2) provide active learning experiences through class sessions and independent projects in the effective use of learning technologies including interactive web applications, multimedia enhanced lectures, social media and course management tools, and 3) promote the importance and scholarship of the evaluation of instructional technology efficacy.
Credit Information: 2 credits

Expeditions in Learning: Exploring How Students Learn with Writing Across the Curriculum

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructor: Stephanie White (The Writing Center)
Time: Thursdays, 10:00-11:30am
Location: The Writing Center, 6172 Helen C. White Hall
Research has shown that, when students write more in a course, they learn course content more effectively. At UW–Madison, many faculty and instructors across the disciplines have taken up this approach by making writing central to their courses. This seminar allows participants to consider the opportunities and challenges of this Writing Across the Curriculum pedagogy. Through expeditions (or mini-field trips), as well as readings and discussions, participants will deepen their theoretical and practical foundations for helping students learn with writing in a range disciplines. Examples of potential expeditions include writing workshops in biology, a Writing Center session, videotapes of student-instructor conferences about writing in progress in sociology, a discussion with faculty about using feedback-manager software in large lecture classes, or analysis of feedback on student writing in psychology. Readings for the seminar will focus on how writing is linked to critical thinking and how writing assignments can help students learn subject matter and teach them discipline-specific ways of writing. Seminar discussions and activities will connect expeditions and readings to teaching practices, so you can learn from others about their diverse experiences and increase your knowledge of using writing to promote student learning in your discipline.

Expeditions in Learning: The First-Year Experience

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructor: Megan Schmid (Center for the First-Year Experience)
Time: Wednesdays, 2-3 p.m.

Location: CFYE Conference Room
Expeditions in Learning is founded on collaborative and experiential learning. The program is designed to take advantage of campus learning opportunities that are new or unique to many, and provide "programmatic permission" and supportive colleagues for you to go places you have never gone before as you explore campus, observe diverse classroom settings, and engage ideas in a new way. Several expeditions (or mini-field trips) are sprinkled throughout the semester supplemented by small-group discussions. The discussions are intended to connect your expeditions to your teaching, to learn from others about their diverse experiences, and to broaden our understandings about each other. This offering of Expeditions in Learning will be focused on the challenges instructors of first-year students face, as well as some developmental reasons for these challenges and tools and strategies to overcome them.

Informal Education: Engage Children in Science (after-school science clubs)

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructors: Dolly Ledin (Institute for Biology Education), Shaheen Sutterwala (Institute for Biology Education)
Time: Wednesdays, 5:30–7 p.m.

Location: 120 Ingraham
UW–Madison students have interest, enthusiasm, and expertise in diverse areas of science, from biology to engineering. And they want to share that enthusiasm and knowledge with the broader community, particularly with younger students. In this course, undergraduates and graduate students come together to apply their science content in an informal science teaching environment, namely an after-school science club. You will expand your own knowledge and appreciation of science, engage with the community and young people in the process of science, grow your cultural literacy, explore mentoring as part of the scientific process, and identify means of evaluating informal learning experiences and techniques for reflecting on your own learning from community-service experiences. This course is offered through the Institute for Biology Education. For more information, e-mail Shaheen Sutterwala.
Credit Information: 2 credits

Informal Education: A Practicum for Scientists

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructors: Wendy Crone (Engineering Physics, Graduate School), Sharon Dunwoody (Journalism)
Time: Thursdays, 8:45–10:45 a.m.

Location: Biochemical Sciences 1220B
Make no mistake about it—one of the most important skills you need to develop during your graduate school career is the ability to communicate your work to a wide array of audiences. That facility enables you to speak effectively about your research with your scientific peers and then walk into an undergraduate classroom to tell a group of 19-year-old students about the same exciting stuff. In this course, you will become familiar with the concepts and processes important to communicate science successfully to a variety of audiences who might have scant knowledge of science, may not be interested in science, or may be diverse in backgrounds and interests. You will learn: 1) the importance of understanding your audience, 2) how to become a better explainer, 3) the design, production, and evaluation of an informal education product, and 4) the breadth of informal science venues and modalities available to the general public.
Credit Information: 2 credits

Instructional Materials Development: Flipping the Classroom

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructor: Trina McMahon (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Time: Mondays, 12–2 p.m.

Location: WisCEL Wendt Commons
Participants in this project-based course work together as teams of faculty, staff, graduate students, and postdocs to design materials and strategies for an existing course that is being "flipped" or converted to a "blended format." A flipped classroom is one in which the expectations of the traditional college lecture have been inverted. It takes many forms, including interactive engagement, use of online resources, just-in-time teaching, and peer instruction. This type of teaching has its benefits as well as challenges, both of which will be explored during the course. During this Instructional Materials Development seminar, the existing traditionally taught course will provide context and focus for the new materials and strategies, and then the teams will work to modify the approach to teaching to implement best practices of a flipped classroom. 
Credit Information: 2 credits

Internship Seminar

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructor: Don Gillian-Daniel (Delta Program)
Time: Tuesdays, 9–10:30 a.m.
Location: Science House (1645 Linden Drive)
The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers the opportunity to develop teaching and learning skills in real-world situations. Each semester, the Delta Program supports a new cohort of interns who partner with faculty and staff to improve teaching and learning environments through innovative teaching-as-research projects. Interns enroll in this seminar during the semester they are completing their internship project, and use the time to present their projects to their peers who provide constructive feedback in real-time. Enrollment is limited to only those students who have applied for and been admitted into the internship program. Visit the Delta Internship Program Web site for more information.
Credit Information: 1 credit

Research Mentor Training Seminar (graduate student and postdoc section)

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructor: Andrew Greenberg (Chemical and Biological Engineering)
Time:Tuesdays, 12:00-12:50 p.m.

Location:3359 Engineering Hall
This Delta Program seminar is designed to help graduate students and postdocs become effective research mentors. Seminar discussions focus on different mentoring styles and strategies for developing confidence, independence, creativity, and communication skills in your current or future mentees. The mentor training seminar consists of weekly one-hour sessions in which participants address issues in mentoring through facilitated discussions based on collaboration and collective problem solving. Participants will read articles and case studies, write biographies of their mentees, compare their goals with those of their mentees, explore time-management strategies, and write mentoring philosophies. This is a terrific opportunity for new mentors to get off on the right foot, and for experienced mentors to share their wisdom.

Credit Information: 1 credit

Teaching Sociology

Registration: Register via your UW Student Center (Sociology 910)

Instructor: John DeLamater (Sociology)
Time: Mondays, 1:20–3:15 p.m.

Location: Social Sciences 6112
This seminar focuses on best-practices in teaching sociology in a college/university setting, primarily to undergraduate students. During the course, you will systematically discuss the major components of a course, including course goals, topic outline, use of readings, use of class time, evaluation of students, and evaluation of yourself as an instructor. In each case, you'll consider the options available and the strengths and weaknesses of each. The seminar is designed to benefit those with and without teaching experience. Those without experience will become sensitized to the many components of effective teaching and receive guidance in the process of preparing a course. Veteran instructors will be encouraged to think more systematically about their teaching and consider alternative forms of instruction.

Credit Information: 3 credits

Teaching Statistics

Registration: Registration CLOSED

Instructor: Rick Nordheim (Statistics)
Time: Wednesdays, 12:30-2 p.m.
Location: Medical Sciences Center, Rm 1210
This 1-credit seminar (Statistics 692) is aimed at graduate students in statistics, as well as statistically oriented students in other departments. A portion of the seminar will be focused on issues of broad relevance to teaching in the sciences, such as learning styles, Bloom's taxonomy, assessment, and the use of technology in the classroom. The remainder of the semester will focus on topics related to the statistics discipline, including how to teach statistics to a range of audiences, from those with reasonable skills in mathematical reasoning to those with math anxiety. Class time will include discussion of readings, visits from guest experts, and active exercises. Outside of class, participants will complete course readings and some short assignments, as well as participate in a small-group project. Preparation time outside of class is anticipated to be 2–3 hours.
Credit Information: 1 credit