Fall 2013 Offerings

The Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning is pleased to offer the following courses and programs for the upcoming fall semester. Most are offered on campus and some can be taken for course credit. Review all the courses and descriptions below and sign up today. Space is limited.

The College Classroom
The College Classroom: International Students, International Faculty
Expeditions in Learning: Internationalizing the STEM Curriculum (NEW!)
Informal Education: Engage Children in Science (after-school science clubs)
Internship Seminar
Research Mentor Training (graduate student and postdoc section)
Research Mentor Training (faculty section)

The College Classroom

Registration: COURSE FULL. Registration closed.

Instructor:  Mitchell Nathan  (Educational Psychology)
Dates & Times: Wednesdays 12:20-2:20pm
Location: Psychology Building, Rm 115
In this course, you will gain knowledge on the basics of learning theory and effective teaching methods so you can operate at the forefront of ideas in college education. You will explore your teaching philosophy and how it will impact your future classes, design a course curriculum, engage in micro-teaching, and learn how to monitor and investigate the effectiveness of a learning environment.
Credit Information: 2 credits

The College Classroom (International)

Registration: COURSE FULL. To register for the waitlist, click here: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_50VQvUyY7mozDFz

Instructor: Michel Wattiaux (Dairy Science)

Time: Fridays, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Location: Genetic-Biotechnology Center Building, Rm 1360

Do you wish to become an effective math, engineering, or science instructor, with a deep understanding of how to use international diversity as an asset rather than a liability in your classroom? If so, this course is for you whether you are a US-born or international graduate student or post-doc. In this course, you will learn the core skills of effective and savvy teachers who can use global perspectives, varied modes of instruction, and differences in students' expectations as tools to increase the learning of every student in their classes.

In essence, this course focuses on the challenges posed by teaching an increasingly diverse student population. Although the course places an emphasis on international instructors and international students, it is not as much about studying cultural, racial and social views as it is to learn how to take advantage of the unique perspectives of each student in our classes to engage them fully in the course content. By the end of the semester, participants who have fully engaged in the activities of this course will have gained knowledge, understanding and hands-on practical skills in creating college courses designed as effective learning environments for their students. This is a discussion-based course modeled after what is now known as "flip-classroom" and "blended learning". For more information, see: https://dairynutrient.wisc.edu/isif/ 
Credit Information: 2 credits 

Expeditions in Learning: Internationalizing the STEM Curriculum

Registration: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_e5JgsSo1u5T8sFD

Instructors: Masarah Van Eyck (CALS International Program Office)

Time: Thursdays, 1:30–3 p.m.

Location: Agriculture Hall, Rm 301

Increased awareness of complex, global problems and the need for interdisciplinary solutions are changing the way we teach STEM students. For example, challenges such as providing clean water and nutritious food to a growing population, while conserving the environment and resources for future generations, will require scientists to integrate data and cultural perspectives from around the world. One way to help science students acquire international skills, attitudes, and knowledge is by “internationalizing” their curriculum. Through expeditions (or mini-field trips), as well as readings and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of how to make this happen and experience the diverse approaches UW-Madison faculty and staff are taking to expose students to the ways in which culture and society influence scientific understanding and application. Readings will explore the scholarship about internationalization theories and pedagogies that support global learning. We will also examine the role that global issues, processes, international policies, and systems play in scientific research and its application. After each expedition we will hear about your reflections on how instructors on campus are internationalizing STEM curriculum and how you might implement these strategies in your teaching.

Credit Information: n/a

Informal Education: Engage Children in Science (after-school science clubs)

Registration: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_50VQvUyY7mozDFz

Instructors: Dolly Ledin (Institute for Biology Education)

Time: Wednesdays, 5:30–7 p.m.

Location: Biochemistry, Rm 1116

UW–Madison undergraduate and graduate students in the sciences have interest, enthusiasm and expertise in many diverse areas of science, from biology to engineering. Many of them have a sincere interest in sharing their enthusiasm and knowledge with younger students but do not have the tools to do so. Though they have adequate scientific background, they need to learn about the learning process, the needs and learning styles of children, techniques for engaging young people in the process of science, means of evaluating informal learning experiences, and techniques for reflecting on their own learning from community service experiences. This course provides them content information, hands-on experiences, and opportunities for dialogue and reflective experiences directly connected to their experience in leading an After School Science Club. The course is part of the Adult Role Models in Science (ARMS) program, a partnership program with the goal of enhancing science education in elementary and middle schools. This course is offered through the Institute for Biology Education. The course requires a one-year commitment and is a 2 semester sequence. For more information see: http://biology.wisc.edu/EngageChildren.htm

Credit Information: 2 credits

Internship Seminar

Registration: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_50VQvUyY7mozDFz

Instructor: Don Gillian-Daniel (Delta Program) and Laura Slane (Biomedical Engineering)

Time: Tuesdays, 9–10:30 a.m. (first day of this seminar will be September 10th)

Location: Educational Sciences Building, Rm 466

The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers the opportunity to develop teaching and learning skills in real-world situations. Each semester, the Delta Program supports a new cohort of interns who partner with faculty and staff to improve teaching and learning environments through innovative Teaching-As-Research projects. Interns enroll in this seminar during the semester in which they are implementing their internship project, and use the time to present their projects to their peers who provide constructive feedback in real-time. Enrollment is limited to only those students who have applied for and been admitted into the internship program. Visit the Delta Internship Program website for more information.
Credit Information: 1 credit

Research Mentor Training Seminar (graduate student and postdoc section)

Registration: COURSE FULL. To register for the waitlist, click here: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6E9TZERCEufbHzn

Instructors: Andrew Greenberg (Chemical and Biological Engineering), Anna Dunn (Chemistry)

Time: Tuesdays, 12-12:50pm

Location: Engineering Hall 3024

This Delta Program seminar is designed to help graduate students and postdocs become effective research mentors. Seminar discussions focus on different mentoring styles and strategies for developing confidence, independence, creativity, and communication skills in your current and future mentees. The mentor training seminar consists of weekly one-hour sessions in which participants address issues in mentoring through facilitated discussions based on collaboration and collective problem solving. Participants will read articles and case studies, write biographies of their mentees, compare their goals with those of their mentees, explore time-management strategies, and write mentoring philosophies. This is a terrific opportunity for new mentors to get off on the right foot, and for experienced mentors to share their wisdom.
Credit Information: 1 credit

Research Mentor Training Seminar (faculty section)

Registration: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_ddqVSmK5T3e6o0B

Instructors:Trina McMahon (Bacteriology and Civil and Environmental Engineering) and Pam Kreeger (Biomedical Engineering)

Time: Every other Monday (starting September 16th), 3:30-4:30pm

Location: 5415 Microbial Sciences Building, 1550 Linden Drive

The success of undergraduate and graduate research experiences depends largely on a positive relationship between the student and the research mentor. Therefore, it is vital that current and future faculty be effective mentors. This Delta Program seminar is designed to help current faculty members become more effective research mentors. Seminar discussions focus on different mentoring styles and strategies for developing confidence, independence, creativity, and communication skills in your mentees. Rather than adding to the time you will spend mentoring, this seminar is designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of your mentoring. The mentor training seminar consists of weekly one-hour sessions in which you will address issues in mentoring through facilitated discussions based on collaboration and collective problem solving.
Credit Information: n/a