Internship Opportunities

The Delta Program partners with faculty and staff around campus to offer a variety of internship opportunities in teaching and learning. In addition to the following listings, you may also work with Delta and other faculty to create your own intership project.

» Improving student learning in introductory psychology courses at Madison College [Fall, Spring]
» Engaging students with introductory biology at a nearby teaching-focused institution [Fall and Spring]
» Develop active learning strategies for introductory psychology at Madison College [Spring]
» Explore an approach that interests you to tackle common problems in General Chemistry [Fall, Spring]
» Improve student learning using online, face-to-face, or telepresence methods for Afro-American, women's, and other history classes at Madison College [Fall, Spring, Summer]
» Engage students with active learning approaches [November-December]
» Integrate online, group work and inclusive strategies in a project-based introductory engineering design course [Fall, Spring]
» Integrate peer reviewed writing and interactive activities into a broad horticulture course [Fall]
» Address student retention issues in kinesiology at Madison College [Fall, Spring and Summer]
» Help transform a microbiology course to effective active learning in a technology-enabled space (WISCEL) [Fall]
» Incorporate international and community connections into a broad agroecology course [Spring]
» Support underperforming students learning with active methods in a large biochemistry course [Fall, Spring and Summer]
» Creating and assessing Nuclear Engineering demonstrations and student learning [Fall]
» Develop content, learning objectives and student evaluations in fluid mechanics [Fall, Spring]
» Develop case studies and formative assessments for new data analytics course
» Help develop a new drone aviation course in College of Engineering [Fall, Spring]
» Create a teachable unit for a microbiolgy seminar course [Oct-Dec planning; Spring course]

» Strategies to enhance service learning course in Human Ecology
» Approaches to technology-enhanced and active learning instructional strategies [Any]
» Developing a blended or 'flipped' learning course in Civil and Environmental Engineering [Fall, Spring]
» Informal science education activity development, testing and evaluation [Any]
» Opportunities to explore learning in innovative face-to-face and virtual physics education projects
» Evaluating and addressing student incoming knowledge gaps in calculus at Madison College [Fall]
» Assessing factors influencing elementary science instruction [Fall, Spring]
» Improve student learning in a conservation biology course [Fall 2016]
» Engage with the development of a skills-based Psychology course [Fall]
» Explore learning community, science identity, success and retention in STEM [Semester: Course-dependent]
» Work with hands-on Biotechnology Training Program at Madison College [Fall, Spring]
» Improve student success and integrate active learning for Intro Psych or a hybrid local/online Sociology course at Madison College [Fall]
» Gain teaching experience and engage students with activities in a climate change course
» Join a team developing and teaching a graduate course focused on inclusive teaching for a diverse nation [Fall development; Spring implementation]
» Integrate clicker questions into a Bio/Psych course [Spring]
» Develop and compare case studies for an introductory Biology course [Spring]


Improving student learning in introductory psychology courses at Madison College [Fall, Spring]

A professor teaching various psychology courses at Madison College is open to internship projects that span many activities toward improving student learning of core concepts and study skill development. An internship at Madison College offers experience in a teaching-focused, diverse institution that can directly translate to your future career goals. Areas of interest include: Connecting the content with real-world experiences, integrating active learning, case studies, technology, effective writing assignments, peer-led study groups, inquiry-based activities, and community-based or service learning. Improving the course climate for diverse students is another potential area of interest.

Dept: Psychology. Course: Intro Psych, Abnormal Psych, Human Sexuality, Developmental Psych. Course info: All are 200-level transfer courses. Required background: Psychology or related social science.

Contact: Jenna Behm-Lawton <JBehm@madisoncollege.edu>

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Engaging students with introductory biology at a nearby teaching-focused institution [Fall and Spring]

Prof Brian O'Neill teaches a largely-nonmajors introductory biology course at UW's Whitewater campus.  This opportunity offers a chance to experience a diverse, teaching-focused primarily undergraduate institution that overall has an enrollment with about 40% first generation college students and 15% underrepresented minorities. He is open to project ideas, particularly teaching the central dogma in an approachable way for those with limited biology background. Other project ideas include a brief growth mindset or self-efficacy  intervention to address fear of science, or motivating interest through activities connecting the content with real-world experiences relevant to students.

 

Dept: Biology. Course: Intro bio. Course info: Instructor teaches one section of 120 students (5 sections total). Required background: Biology-based discipline.

Contact: Brian O'Neill <oneillb@uww.edu>

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Develop active learning strategies for introductory psychology at Madison College [Spring]

 

Various projects are possible in an introductory psychology course at Madison College, which offers experience at an undergraduate teaching-focused, diverse institution. Prof Dubree is open to talking with an intern about projects that seek to improve student conceptual learning using active learning activities or technology-based strategies.

 

Dept: Psychology. Course: Intro Psychology, incl brain structure and function. Course info: Course includes group work activities. Required background: Psychology.

Contact: Maryann Dubree <mdubree@madisoncollege.edu>

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Explore an approach that interests you to tackle common problems in General Chemistry [Fall, Spring]

 

The General Chemistry course at Madison College offers an experience teaching core concepts using a student-centered approach to a diverse class. The instructor is a former graduate student who has a certificate in teaching/learning similar to the DELTA certificate.   He is open to talking with interns about projects that would aim to develop new course materials, improve conceptual learning, address disparate incoming student backgrounds, improve feedback to students, or support under-performing  students. Strategies might include problem-based learning, case studies, active learning, peer-study groups, inquiry labs, or integrating technology such as a flipped classroom.

 

Dept: Chemistry. Course: Chem 134 (includes lab) # of students: 32 per class; 2 classes Required background: Introductory chemistry.

Contact: Nilhan Gunasekera <ngunasekera@madisoncollege.edu>

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Improve student learning using online, face-to-face, or telepresence methods for Afro-American, women's, and other history classes at Madison College [Fall, Spring, Summer]

 

Gain experience across teaching modes, from face-to-face to online teaching, with a project in various History courses at Madison College. Prof Bohman-Cina is open to projects across many goals and strategies. These include: Developing new course materials, improving conceptual learning, supporting underperforming students, addressing disparate incoming student backgrounds, improving feedback to enhance student learning. She is interested in projects from a wide range of approaches, from connections to real-world experiences and service learning to peer-study groups and integrating active learning techniques. Interns doing projects at Madison College often find the teaching focus and diverse institution to be valuable for teaching professional development.

 

Dept: History. Course: Various History courses, incl Afro-American history online, Native American history telepresence, Global Women's History. Course info: Face-to-face, telepresence, or online; power lectures + group work and discussion.. Required background: Some coursework in history, ethnic or gender/women's studies, including Afro-American Studies, Native American Studies, African Studies, Gender and Women's Studies .

Contact: Christine Bohman-Cina <cbohman-cina@madisoncollege.edu>

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Engage students with active learning approaches [November-December]

 

Peter Muir teaches a small animal surgery course for veterinary professional students. Weekly take home, case-based assessment has been used for several years for this course. The course is designed to teach clinical subjects using a principles / critical thinking approach. While pedagogically good, this approach produces a disconnect for students with most of the other courses in the veterinary school which use standard multiple choice question exams. A Delta intern would work with Peter on course development to further encourage student engagement with the course and help students to understand how the course is structured to help their learning.

 

Dept: Veterinary - Dept of Surgical Sciences. Course: 938-630 Small Animal Surgery. Course info: Vet professional course, 3rd yr students. ~ 80 stds/yr. Capstone level. Required background: Course content not critical; familiarity with assessment and course syllabus design.

Contact: Peter Muir <muirp@vetmed.wisc.edu>

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Integrate online, group work and inclusive strategies in a project-based introductory engineering design course [Fall, Spring]

 

A freshman engineering design course, InterEgr170, is developing activities, materials and assessments to create a more scalable, active and inclusive course. One of the objectives is to increase student retention in engineering, especially for underrepresented minorities including women. The course is project-based, and students spend the entire semester working on a team. An intern or team of interns could work with the instructors on these projects: 1. Develop online videos, quizzes, and related interactive class materials (blended/flipped learning); 2. Select and implement strategies to improve teamwork skills for group work; 3. Provide supportive and inclusive learning environment through course curriculum and student activities, e.g. bias training based on recommendations by the COE Equity and Diversity Committee.  4.  Contribute to grant proposals and conference abstracts (such as ASEE).

 

Dept: Engineering, several. Course: Inter Egr 170. Course info: Project-based, large, first-year course dvided in ~10  sections. Required background: By project # above: 1. Some experience with client-driven product design and/or problem-solving process; 2. Interest
in project-based teamwork best practices; 3. Interest in inclusive course strategies..

Contact: Tracy Jane Puccinelli  <tjpuccinelli@bme.wisc.edu> and Katie Kalscheur <kkalscheur@wisc.edu>

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Integrate peer reviewed writing and interactive activities into a broad horticulture course [Fall]

 

A Delta intern would work with Claudia on either of the following projects:
* Integrate calibrated peer review (an active learning method gaining rapid acceptance that engages peer learning and is particularly useful for large lecture classes) as a feedback mechanism into the course for writing and/or student presentation assessments.
* Enhancing interactive activities and improving assessment in the course, which has a problem-based learning structure.

 

Dept: Horticulture. Course: Horticulture 374: Tropical Horticulture. Course info: Seminar. Required background: Biology, esp. plant biology. Knowledge of plant breeding, agriculture or horiculture are a plus..

Contact: Claudia Calderon <cicalderon@wisc.edu>

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Address student retention issues in kinesiology at Madison College [Fall, Spring and Summer]

 

The Physical Therapist Assistant two year associate degree program at Madison College wants to address student retention issues. Many students who leave the program have difficulty with two Kinesiology courses that are both required as part of the core curriculum. A Delta intern will work with the faculty to develop support strategies for students in the courses. For example, an intern might create online materials or tutorials for students to access outside of class time. Or they could develop additional assignments or activities to engage students with the content in or after class. There is also the opportunity to develop an approach that adapts Madison College’s Supplemental Instruction model.

 

Dept: Kinesiology/Physical Therapy. Course: multiple. Course info: introductory. Required background: Anatomy & physiology as well as kinesiology. Helpful but not necessary: Background with physical therapy.

Contact: Jamesetta Fousek <Fousek@madisoncollege.edu>

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Help transform a microbiology course to effective active learning in a technology-enabled space (WISCEL) [Fall]

 

Briana Burton is teaching Microbiology 470: Microbial Genetics & Molecular Machines, a jr/senior level course that is required for Microbiology majors. She is developing materials to teach the course in the technology-enabled, active-learning WISCEL space in fall. She is interested in partnering with an intern to design, implement and evaluate a course module, transforming it from the current, traditional lecture format to take advantage of active learning in the WISCEL. A background in molecular biology is needed, and exposure to genetics and biochemistry would be helpful.

 

Dept: Bacteriology, Microbiology. Course: Microbiology 470: Microbial Genetics & Molecular Machines. Course info: jr/sr level required for majors. Required background: Molecular biology; exposure to genetics and biochemistry is helpful.

Contact: Briana Burton < briana.burton@wisc.edu>

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Incorporate international and community connections into a broad agroecology course [Spring]

 

Valentin Picasso is developing a course, Cropping Systems of the Tropics (Ag 377), integrating agroecology, environmental impacts and social dimensions. An intern could shape a project involving developing and assessing one of the following: using technology to connect the classroom directly with international farmers/researchers, service learning and engaging with local community members, and incorporating real-world elements such as cooking foods.

 

Dept: Agriculture, possibly x-l with Horticulture, Dairy Science, Animal Science, Soil Science, Agroecology, Global Health. Course: Ag 377: Cropping Systems of the World. Course info: A mix of students, up to 60; learner-centered with small group discussions and activities. Required background: Course is broad. Some confidence in one of: Agronomy/Hort/Plant Sciences, Ecology/Botany, Food Science, Sociology/Economic Development.

Contact: Valentin Picasso Risso <picassorisso@wisc.edu>

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Support underperforming students learning with active methods in a large biochemistry course [Fall, Spring and Summer]

 

Lisa Lenertz teaches Biochemistry 501 (Introduction to Biochemistry). Enrollment in the course is enormous and there is a wide range in the abilities of the students enrolled. Lisa wants to develop a program to help students who are struggling the most. A Delta intern will work with her to develop a strategy to recruit students into the program and to develop effective active learning exercises. There will be opportunities to facilitate a discussion section(s) and evaluate student learning. This course is taught spring, summer and fall. Lisa likes to help graduate students and postdocs who are interested in teaching obtain the experiences they need to develop a marketable teaching portfolio.

 

Dept: Biochemistry. Course: Biochemistry 501: Intro to Biochemistry. Course info: Primarily juniors; lg lecture + multiple discussion sections. Required background: Some biochemistry; Recommeded: active learning in small discussion section.

Contact: Lisa Lenertz <lenertzlinde@wisc.edu>

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Creating and assessing Nuclear Engineering demonstrations and student learning [Fall]

 

Raluca Scarlat teaches NEEP 411 – Nuclear Reactor Engineering. Raluca is developing a series of demonstrations for the course to help students develop a more intuitive understanding, beyond just the equations, of the phenomena they are learning about in class. A Delta intern has the opportunity to assist in the development of these demonstrations during the summer. They will also be involved in implementing the demonstrations in the classroom in the fall, and evaluating student learning as a result of engaging with the new instructional materials. A paid grader position will likely be available for this class, and could be combined with the internship. The course focuses on both the fundamental theory of heat transfer as well as safety analysis of reactor systems; course syllabus can be found here: http://heatandmass.ep.wisc.edu/wp-uploads/2015/01/Syllabus_NE411_Fall-2014.pdf.

 

Dept: Engineering. Course: NEEP 411 – Nuclear Reactor Engineering. Course info: Sr level undergrad, some grad std.

Contact: Raluca Scarlat <roscarlat@wisc.edu>

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Develop content, learning objectives and student evaluations in fluid mechanics [Fall, Spring]

 

Mario F Trujillo teaches ME 363 (Fluid Mechanics) and has noticed that students do not develop a solid connection between the mathematics and the physics underlying the content. He has been developing new content by building a more solid foundation for the governing equations to inform problem solving,  and wants to evaluate how well students learn as a result of engaging with the content. A Delta intern will work with Mario to continue the development of content, learning objectives, and aligning evaluations with those learning objectives.

 

Dept: Mechanical Engineering. Course: ME 363: Fluid Mechanics. Required background: Communication skills. Fluid mechanics background not required.

Contact: Mario F Trujillo <mtrujillo@wisc.edu>

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Develop case studies and formative assessments for new data analytics course

 

Kaibo Liu is offering a new course, Fundamentals of Industrial Data Analytics. The course is the first data analytics course for undergraduates in the U.S. The course has a lecture component (data analytics), a laboratory (programming for data analysis) and a project where students work with real data sets and develop meaningful questions. A Delta intern will develop effective ways to get formative student feedback during the course. There is also an opportunity to develop content to make case studies more realistic and effective for promoting student learning.

 

Dept: Engineering. Course: Fundamentals of Industrial Data analytics.

Contact: Kaibo Liu <kliu8@wisc.edu>

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Help develop a new drone aviation course in College of Engineering [Fall, Spring]

 

Chris Johnson is developing a new minor degree in Aviation in the College of Engineering. The degree will be based on a ground school course, flight courses, Drone/UAV certification as well as business and human factors courses among others. Chris is interested in working with a Delta intern to create a new UAV course for this training and certification. This is an opportunity to create the course from its beginning. An intern would work with Chris to develop learning objectives, educational content specific to UAV devices, and accompanying assessments of student learning.

 

Dept: Engineering. Course info: Small seminar certification course toward licensure. Required background: Helpful but not required: Some background in aviation. If content creation project, video editing experience helpful- although the program (Camtasia) is easy to learn..

Contact: Chris Johnson <cmjohnson28@wisc.edu>

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Create a teachable unit for a microbiolgy seminar course [Oct-Dec planning; Spring course]

 

Jae-Hyuk Yu teaches Microbiology 305, an undergraduate seminar course about current topics in Microbiology. He is interested in generating new content for the course. A Delta intern will work with Jae-Hyuk to create a teachable unit (1 hour of material, journal club style). This involves identifying a new and impactful paper in the field, developing homework assignments, in class questions and mini-lectures based on the topic. The teaching approach is based in sound teaching practices, including multiple activities to engage students, ongoing and rigorous assessment, and attention to diversity.  An intern will have the opportunity to teach an entire section of Micro 305. The new teachable unit will be incorporated into 1 of 15 lectures for that semester.  Micro 305 has 4 sections of about 16 undergraduates per section. Jae Hyuk's course engages students from the Microbiology Teaching Fellow program.

 

Dept: Microbiology. Course info: undergraduate seminar on current topics. Required background: Any life sciences/biology-related background included, but not limited to: microbiology, genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, plant pathology, virology; 3rd yr or later graduate student or post-doc.

Contact: Jae-Hyuk Yu <jyu1@wisc.edu>

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Strategies to enhance service learning course in Human Ecology

Carolina teaches a community-based service learning course in the UW School of Human Ecology. As the course involves partnering with diverse urban communities, one challenge is ensuring that the students (largely white) engage effectively with communities different from themselves. A Delta intern will help explore this challenge and strategies to enhance the course, working with quantitative and qualitative data. Options include working with supplementary opportunities such as workshops exploring values and experiences, using materials such as games to achieve educational objectives, and developing strategies to evaluate student learning its relationship to diversity.

Dept: Human Ecology. Course info: community-based service learning.

Contact: Carolina S. Sarmiento <carolina.sarmiento@wisc.edu>
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Approaches to technology-enhanced and active learning instructional strategies [Any]

The Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL) uses technology-enhanced, collaboration-friendly spaces to promote student-centered active learning. Two opportunities are available. Both offer the intern an opportunity to get a broad view of approaches to technology-enhanced and active learning instructional strategies.
1. Develop and pilot observational protocols to evaluate active learning strategies. This offers an intern the opportunity to connect with a developing topic in the teaching and learning literature and field-test a tool across multiple courses taught in the WisCEL.
2. Get in-depth experience exploring mixed methods and qualitative data, working with an experienced program evaluator. Design a framework and analyze existing qualitative and quantitative datasets regarding the use of the WisCEL space for active, collaborative and flipped instructional strategies, and classroom integration of technology.  Analyses will consider use and impacts of strategies and WisCEL resources (i.e., within-courses, between-courses, and over time).

Dept: Several. Course: Several.

Contact: Sarah Mason <samason@wisc.edu>
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Developing a blended or 'flipped' learning course in Civil and Environmental Engineering [Fall, Spring]

The College of Engineering is in the process of “flipping” many core courses in order to create blended learning environments. This involves providing course content to students outside of the classroom, so class sessions can be used for higher order activities like problem solving. A Delta intern will work with Trina to develop course content for face-to-face and online delivery and problem-based modules. They will also help implement the course and evaluate student learning from the flipped classroom approach.

Dept: Engineering. Course: Several. Course info: Introductory; 80-100 students in blended mode. Required background: Any STEM background.

Contact: Trina McMahon <tmcmahon@cae.wisc.edu>
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Informal science education activity development, testing and evaluation [Any]

The UW’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (UW MRSEC) Education Group uses examples of cutting edge research to teach people of all backgrounds fundamental science and engineering concepts and to excite them about the importance of science and engineering. This intern will work with the MRSEC staff to create, field test, and evaluate a new education activity. They will learn about informal science education, explore how to effectively communicate science to public audiences, learn about translating research science to K-12 appropriate activities, and discover how to assess participant learning in informal education.

Dept: Outreach. Course: Any. Course info: K-12 outreach. Required background: Any science background.

Contact: Anne Lynn Gillian-Daniel <agillian@wisc.edu>
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Opportunities to explore learning in innovative face-to-face and virtual physics education projects

Duncan Carlsmith is developing a number of novel approaches to teaching physics, many using a virtual or blended learning environment. Across the projects listed below, a Delta intern will have the opportunity to explore physics education in a novel (often virtual) setting, think about development of prototype materials to promote learning and create an evaluation strategy to gauge the effectiveness of the approach for promoting student learning.

1. Flexible Physics Mobile: The Flexible Physics project goal is to create mobile and web-based educational learning objects to help prepare students and TAs for physics labs. Videos are designed to bridge the gap between lecture and lab. (see: http://flexible.physics.wisc.edu/)

A Delta intern will have the opportunity to: Develop strategies to evaluate student learning from the videos; Assist with implementation of these video-based educational objects in the course; Develop strategies to evaluate different deployment strategies for mobile device use.
 
2. Garage Physics
: The Garage Physics lab in Sterling Hall (see:https://wiki.physics.wisc.edu//garage) is an innovative model of sandbox self-study, mentoring, and invention intended to support hands-on learning and research. It offers undergraduates a place to play with physics demonstrations and equipment, to explore and develop existing and new techniques required for work in research laboratories, and to pursue creative ideas and conduct independent research in an unstructured safe environment.

A Delta intern will have the opportunity to: Assist in the development of education goals around use of the space; Develop assessment strategies for the open-lab experiment; Explore how the open-lab experiment aligns with or complements the goals and strategies in existing structured educational laboratories.

3. Actual Physics: Actual physics is a prototype for distance learners that offers web-accessible, remotely-controlled actuated real experiments. Experiments are designed to provide a user experience close to “being there”. In an experiment, the user would operate the actual equipment, make visual and auditory observations, and collect and analyze data.

A Delta intern will have the opportunity to: Consider goals and design strategies for this online learning environment; Assist with the development of a prototype experiment; Implement aspects of the prototype; Create an evaluation strategy around student learning promoted by the approach.

4. Physics Game Lab:
A number of online and blended physics learning materials exist, but the lab component of physics classes is inadequately addressed online. Physics game lab engages students through opportunities to explore, discover and analyze physical principles online. The virtual labs will allow users to discover and use instrumentation, design experiments, observe physical processes, collect and analyze data, and share results and conclusions. A goal of the project is to design virtual experiences that can only be made available in a virtual environment (e.g., operation of the Large Hadron Collider).

A Delta intern will have the opportunity to: Assist with the design of the online laboratory learning environment; Explore gaming principles to support development of the virtual labs; Assist with the creation of a prototype laboratory; Develop a strategy to evaluate student learning in the online laboratory relative to a classroom-based setting.

Dept: Physics. Course: Several. Required background: Preferable physics or astronomy, and technology savvy or curious; creative and self-directed.

Contact: Duncan Carlsmith <duncancarlsmith@gmail.com>
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Evaluating and addressing student incoming knowledge gaps in calculus at Madison College [Fall]

Getting students up to speed and addressing incoming knowledge gaps for Calculus I is challenging. A Delta intern would help to first understand patterns and sources of knowledge gaps. Strategies to date have included lectures/homework, review packets, and quizzes. A follow-up semester to address knowledge gaps might incorporate the Assessment and Learning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) system,  a web-based, artificially intelligent mathematics learning product that is designed to assess and improve student facility with pre-calculus topics.

Dept: Math. Course: Calculus I.

Contact: Sarah C Bannen <SCBANNEN@madisoncollege.edu>
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Assessing factors influencing elementary science instruction [Fall, Spring]

The  Delta course “Engage Children in Science: Lead After-School Science Clubs” is a service learning course that provides training for both undergraduate and graduate students in how to effectively lead science activities with children.  Students in the course lead weekly after-school science clubs at various sites throughout Madison. We would like to extend our robust evaluation tools for student leaders to explore outcomes for the children participating (grades 3-5). Outcomes such as attitudes towards science, use of science process skills, and confidence in their scientific abilities. The intern will learn about best practices in informal science education, visit science clubs and observe/ participate in fun science projects with kids, develop innovative ways to measure children’s attitudes and understanding towards science in the science club setting.  

Dept: Outreach.

Contact: Dolly Ledin <daledin@wisc.edu>
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Improve student learning in a conservation biology course [Fall 2016]

Don Waller teaches a senior-level conservation biology course and is considering several different ideas to improve student learning, including: designing, facilitating and assessing optional workshops for the quantitative assignments (e.g. population genetics- inbreeding & population tructure, and risks to small populations). An intern might also consider projects involving a writing assignment and/or leading weekly discussions.

Dept: Botany, Zoology, Env Studies. Course: Cons Bio 651. Course info: 2 lecture + 1 disc per week + one weekend field trip (Baraboo). For seniors and grad students.  ~ 40 students. Required background: Strong in ecology, evolution and conservation biology.

Contact: Don Waller <dmwaller@wisc.edu>
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Engage with the development of a skills-based Psychology course [Fall]

Vanessa Simmering is developing a senior seminar in Psychology, and an intern would engage with designing and aligning learning outcomes, assessments and activities. The seminar is focused on analytical skill outcomes across student-driven content. Course goals include evaluating and interpreting popular press articles relative to primary research, and understanding the complexity of factors contributing to human development outcomes. The course could also involve blended learning or collaborative group work projects.

Dept: Psychology. Course: Psych special topics: Unexpected Influences on Child Development. Course info: Senior capstone seminar, discussion-based, ~25 students. Required background: Interest in the course goals; some background in psychology or child development helpful.

Contact: Vanessa Simmering <simmering@wisc.edu>
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Explore learning community, science identity, success and retention in STEM [Semester: Course-dependent]

Chris Trimby is interested in projects involving learning communities; science identity; success and retention for first-year and transfer students; or other ideas based in your interests that fit with the course. Courses he is involved with include Exploring Biology, a first year concept-based course taught in the WisCEL, a technology-enabled active learning space; Secrets of Science, a small seminar exploring the science process; STEM Transfer seminar, a first-year seminar for STEM transfer students kicking off in fall 2017; and the STEM boot camp, a pre-semester program for incoming students, typically from underserved populations.

Dept: WISCIENCE. Course: Various. Course info: Varies. Required background: Expl Bio and Secrets of Science: Biology background; STEM boot camp and transfer seminar: Any STEM background.

Contact: Chris Trimby <trimby@wisc.edu>
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Work with hands-on Biotechnology Training Program at Madison College [Fall, Spring]

Oana Martin at Madison College teaches various laboratory skills, biochemistry and related courses as part of Madison College's hands-on Biotechnology Training Program. She is open to working with a Delta intern on various project ideas, including improving student conceptual understanding and study skill development by strategies such as project-based learning, online quizzes and videos, and adding authentic inquiry components and new experiments to the labs.

Dept: Biotechnology Technician Program. Course: Various. Course info: Laboratory Skills (laboratory), Proteins Bioseparations (Laboratory), Applied Biochemistry (lecture and laboratory). Required background: Biology and Chemistry.

Contact: Oana Martin <ommartin@madisoncollege.edu>
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Improve student success and integrate active learning for Intro Psych or a hybrid local/online Sociology course at Madison College [Fall]

Joe Anistranski at Madison College teaches Intro Psych, a 20 student lecture. He also teaches a blended telepresence/local Sociology course with 20 students. He is open to working with a Delta intern on various project ideas, including: improving student conceptual understanding; improving drop and fail rates; study skill development; and the development of new course materials. Strategies might include connecting the course to real-world student experiences, problem-based learning, or integrating technology and active learning into the course. NOTE: The courses are held at the Fort Atkinson site (about 40 min drive from campus); meetings with Joe for project development & discussion would be on or near the UW Madison campus.

Dept: Psychology. Course: Intro Psych & Sociology. Course info: 20 std lecture. Required background: Helpful- Background in psychology/development for both; sociology for the sociology course.

Contact: Joe Anistranski <anistranski@live.com>
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Gain teaching experience and engage students with activities in a climate change course

Leah Horowitz teaches Climate Change Governance, a Nelson Institute course designed to engage students with small groups and activities. She is also moving toward blended/flipped classroom strategies. This opportunity offers a Delta intern strong direct contact and teaching experience, as the intern would work with Leah to lead one weekly discussion with in-class activities (the intern would be expected to attend course lectures 2/week.) Project ideas of interest include using best practices to improve small group discussions and in-class activities and assessments, and using lecture videos and in-class activities to move toward a blended classroom model. Course content examines efforts to mitigate across scales from international treaties to individual behavior.

Dept: Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. Course: ES402: Climate Change Governance. Course info: ~ 25-50 upper-level undergraduates. Required background: Ideally some background in climate change.

Contact: Leah Horowitz <lhorowitz@wisc.edu>
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Join a team developing and teaching a graduate course focused on inclusive teaching for a diverse nation [Fall development; Spring implementation]

Conrad and Gasman’s book, Educating a Diverse Nation, highlights innovative programs at Minority Serving Institutions that are advancing student persistence and learning. Don Gillian-Daniel, Delta’s Associate Director, is developing a new credit-based course for graduate students based on the book. Course development will be through Fall 2016 and the course will be offered in Spring 2017. A Delta intern will have the opportunity to shape a teaching-as-research project and join a team to co-create this course in Fall of 2016 and co-instruct in Spring 2017.  More information about the book can be found in this New York Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/23/education/learning-to-educate-an-increasingly-diverse-nation.html?_r=0

Dept: Delta Program in Research, Teaching & Learning. Course: TBD. Course info: Graduate-level discussion-based course. Required background: Interest in inclusive teaching; prior Delta course (internship prerequisite).

Contact: Don Gillian-Daniel, Delta’s Associate Director <dldaniel@wisc.edu>
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Integrate clicker questions into a Bio/Psych course [Spring]

Meg Waraczynski is interested in incorporating a technology getting broad national attention, "clicker questions", in a lecture course  at UW's Whitewater campus.  This opportunity offers a chance to experience a diverse, teaching-focused primarily undergraduate institution that overall has an enrollment with about 40% first generation college students and 15% underrepresented minorities. She is interested in using clickers to support underperforming students, increase engagement and improve conceptual understanding. An intern would have the opportunity to align the clicker use with known best practices and develop the teaching plan around clickers.

Dept: Psychology and Biological Sciences. Course: Bio/Psych 301 Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience. Course info: Lecture-based; ~75 juniors/seniors in Bio and Psych. Required background: Basic (tutorials on concepts can be provided) background in neurobiology; willingness to come onsite to UW Whitewater (approx. 1 hr drive from UW Madison campus) a few times. The course meets late afternoons Mondays and Wednesdays.

Contact: Meg Waraczynski <waraczym@uww.edu>

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Develop and compare case studies for an introductory Biology course [Spring]

Faculty with Introductory Biology 152 are seeking an intern to assist in developing case studies for an entirely case-based section of the course. In its third year, the case section leverages active learning, independent research, and regular scientific writing practice to engage students in the biological sciences. A Delta intern would have the opportunity to develop and assess new case studies, as well as comparing learning outcomes with existing case studies and traditional strategies.

Dept: Zoology. Course: Intro Bio 152. Course info: Twice weekly case-section meetings and a weekly lab; approx 200 students in this section. Required background: Background in any of the following: plant physiology, evolution, ecology.

Contact:
Julie Collins <jecollins4@wisc.edu>

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