Workshops

The Delta Program hosts a variety of annual workshops to help participants with their professional development around teaching and learning. These workshops sometimes require registration so we can make sure we have enough materials. Everyone from graduate students to faculty is welcome to attend.

Assignment Design Workshop (Co-sponsored by DoIT Academic Technology)
Developing Your Teaching and Mentoring Statement
Teaching Portfolio Workshop
Pre-Internship Workshop Series
CAREER Award Workshop: Writing Your Research and Education Plan
Using Writing Activities to Solve Teaching and Learning Challenges in any STEM Course
How to Address the Broader Impact in Your NSF Fellowship Application
Creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP) (Co-sponsored by the Graduate School Office of Professional Development)
Pulling It All Together: Crafting Your CV/Resume and Cover Letter
The Scientific Writer's Toolbox: Developing Strategies for Effective Manuscript Writing NEW!
The Unique Challenges of Engaging and Teaching First Year Students NEW!
Introduction to Instructional Design Processes Workshop NEW!

Assignment Design Workshop

Date: TBD

Time: TBD
Location:
TBD

Registration closed.

 

This workshop is designed for graduate students and postdocs, including TAs. Design processes help instructors plan assignments, activities, and assessments that align with course goals, content, and skills students learn. In this workshop use a Backward Design process to collaboratively analyze, and plan an assignment and its assessment criteria.

Bring an assignment (or the idea of an assignment) to work on, and a copy of your course syllabus.

This workshop is being offered in collaboration with DoIT Academic Technology. Registration is required.


Developing your Teaching and Mentoring Statement

Date: September 15, 2016

Time: 9:00-11:00 am
Location:
Union South (TITU)

Facilitators: Jessica Maher, Delta Program and Amber Smith, WISCIENCE

Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_b2gMQfZj1L7pwTr

 

This workshop is designed to help participants develop their statement(s) of teaching and mentoring philosophy. These documents are a common component of faculty job application materials, and yet can prove challenging to write. Through hands-on exercises and constructive peer feedback, participants will leave with material for a draft of their teaching and mentoring statement(s). You do not need to have a prior draft of your statement in order to participate in the workshop.


Teaching Portfolio Workshop

These workshops are designed to help students develop a teaching portfolio and have this and other components of a faculty job application materials peer-reviewed. These include a teaching philosophy, mentoring and diversity statements. You can choose to attend either or both of the workshops depending on your needs. Please register for the workshops individually through the links below. Registration is required.

 

Teaching Portfolio Workshop

Date: TBD

Time: TBD
Location:
TBD

Registration closed.

Participants will learn about the three elements of a teaching portfolio (teaching and learning philosophy, artifacts, and reflective statement), participate in hands-on learning activities and group discussions, see examples of successful teaching portfolios, and leave with draft materials for the artifact and reflective statement elements.

Supplemental Workshop Materials:

Delta Teaching and Learning Portfolio Guidebook (PDF)
Example Portfolios

Pre-Internship Workshop Series

The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers practical experience to develop their skills and interests in teaching and learning. Each semester, a diverse cohort of interns works with their faculty or staff mentor on a Teaching-As-Research project. This 2-part workshop series is intended to prepare students to engage in an internship project in the following semester. The 2nd workshop in the series is a required part of the internship. If you have any questions about the Delta Internship Program or the Pre-Internship Workshop, contact Don Gillian-Daniel at dldaniel@wisc.edu.

 

Pre-Internship Workshop I: Finding a Project

October 5, 2016

9:30-10:30 am

445 Henry Mall, Room 117 (WISCIENCE Conference Room)

Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_eEusjDHZBgauijz

Attendees will meet to discuss potential internship projects and partners. This session is for students who do not yet have a specific project or partner in mind. The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers practical experience to develop their skills and interests in teaching and learning. Each semester, a diverse cohort of interns works with their faculty or staff mentor on a teaching-as-research project. Registration is required.

 

Pre-Internship Workshop II: Developing Your Project

October 25, 2016

9:00am-12:00pm

445 Henry Mall, Room 117 (WISCIENCE Conference Room)

Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_eEusjDHZBgauijz

Attendees will define their internship project, develop their project plan, explore available resources, and learn more about the university's institutional review board (IRB) process that facilitates responsible research. This session is for students who do have a specific project and partner planned. Students preparing to complete their Delta internship project during the subsequent semester are required to attend this workshop. Workshop attendees should have already completed at least one semester-long Delta course and be intending to complete their internship project next semester. Registration is required.

Supplemental Workshop Materials:

Delta Internship Guidebook (PDF)


CAREER Award Workshop: Writing Your Research and Education Plan

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Delta Program and WISCIENCE.

Date: This workshop will be offered again in June 2017.

Time: TBD

Location: TBD

 

The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program offers the foundation's most prestigious awards. It supports junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research. All CAREER proposals must have an integrated research and education plan at their core, and this workshop offered by the Delta Program and WISCIENCE will help you think creatively about how your plan can reflect your own disciplinary and educational interests and goals, as well as the needs and context of your organization. During the workshop, you will discuss strategies for writing a successful education plan, listen to faculty who have submitted successful proposals as they share their tips and insights on the review process, and start drafting your proposal. The workshop is designed for new faculty preparing to submit proposals in all fields of science, engineering, and mathematics.

 

Workshop Materials:

» UW-Madison Resources for CAREER Proposal

PDF 2016 CAREER Workshop Materials Packet

PDF Integrating Broader Impacts into your Research Proposal

PDF Ahna Skop Presentation 2016

PDF Bulent Sarlioglu Presentation 2016

Library Resources

MRSEC and Broader Impacts 2016

Badger BOTS

» Mathieu RD, Pfund C, Gillian-Daniel DL.  2009.  Leveraging the NSF Broader Impacts criterion for change in STEM education. Change Magazine. 41(3):50-55   http://www.cirtl.net/bibliography/ag/M?sort=author&order=asc.

» National Alliance for Broader Impacts

» STEM Library Research Guide


Using Writing Activities to Solve Teaching and Learning Challenges in any STEM Course

Date: This workshop is offered in the summer.

Time:TBD

Location: TBD

Co-facilitators: TBD


Well-designed writing assignments can help students learn the subject matter of a course more deeply, increase students’ engagement with complex topics, and give course instructors valuable insight into what students understand—and what they don’t. But it can be difficult to design writing assignments that advance specific course goals and encourage students to take responsibility for their own learning. In this interactive workshop, we’ll share advice, examples, and best practices for using writing to its full potential in SBE and STEM courses. We’ll discuss research about interactive writing assignments that advance student learning; analyze effective examples of syllabi and assignments from a range of SBE and STEM courses at UW–Madison, including small seminars, large lecture courses, and labs; consider how writing can be used to both develop community in your classroom and to enter broader disciplinary communities; and discuss ways to design effective evaluation rubrics to give efficient feedback on writing assignments. Finally, you'll have a chance to draft and get feedback on a new writing assignment to use in your own teaching. Registration is required.


Broader Impacts Workshop: How to Address the Broader Impact in Your NSF Fellowship Application

Date: October 7, 2016

Time: 1:00-3:00 pm

Location: Microbial Sciences Bldg., Ebling Auditorium

Workshop leaders: Trina McMahon (Civil and Environmental Engineering), Kevin Niemi (WISCIENCE), Irina Diaz (UW-Madison Graduate School), Don Gillian-Daniel (Delta Program)

Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_eJ9JCVeIeSKK0u1


The National Science Foundation (NSF) employs two criteria in the review of Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) applications, namely intellectual merit and broader impact. Experience shows that while most applicants have little difficulty responding to the criterion relating to intellectual merit, many struggle to frame the broader impacts of the activities they propose to undertake. To address the broader impacts, applications are expected to include ways in which activities and projects will advance discovery and understanding, broaden the participation of underrepresented groups, enhance the infrastructure for research and education, and ultimately benefit society. This workshop is designed to help you address the concept of broader impacts in your fellowship application, and specifically is a time for you to discuss strategies for writing a successful broader impact plan, hear from panelists about successful fellowship proposals, and learn about resources on campus focused on effective integration of research and education.

 

Supplemental Workshop Materials:

PDF Delta Broader Impacts Workshop Presentation 2016

PDF NSF GRFP Programs to Leverage 2016

PDF Delta Broader Impacts Workshop Delta Overview Presentation 2016


Creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP)

Co-sponsored by the Graduate School Office of Professional Development and Delta Program.

Date: October 5, 2016

Time: 4:30-6:00 pm

Location: 159 Wisconsin Idea Room, Education Bldg.

Register online: http://bit.ly/1rlVOMr

 

An individual development plan (IDP) encourages you to think about what you need to do next – and over the next few years – to achieve your goals. We will discuss how to define achievable goals, identify resources, and develop strategies for implementing and sustaining your plans. Participants will begin creating a personalized plan, taking into account career interests and addressing the development of knowledge and skills for professional growth. Registration is required.


Pulling It All Together: Crafting Your CV/Resume and Cover Letter

Date: September 22, 2016

Time: 9:00-11:00 am
Location:
Union South (TITU)

Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9REKkdKN7D0PJRz

 

In developing your written credentials and preparing application materials for your job search, it is crucial to represent your professional experience, accomplishments, expertise, and professional development experiences in the most impactful manner possible. Participants are asked to bring a hard copy of their CV/resume or a job application letter to this workshop. Join us and learn how to write your way into an interview!

Registration is required.


The Scientific Writer's Toolbox: Developing Strategies for Effective Manuscript Writing

Date: TBD

Time: TBD

Location: TBD

Facilitator: Courtney Venker (Assistant Scientist, Waisman Center)

 

The Scientific Writer’s Toolbox is designed for graduate students in STEM and social sciences who want to improve the quality and quantity of their scientific writing. Using a hands-on approach, this workshop will help participants identify and overcome hurdles to writing productivity. This workshop will also provide concrete strategies for improving the clarity and effectiveness of scientific writing, with a focus on both local issues (e.g., word choice, sentence structure) and global issues (e.g., telling a story with your writing). Registration is required.


The Unique Challenges of Engaging and Teaching First Year Students

How to get freshmen to pay attention in class and engage them in their own learning!

Date: September 8, 2016

Time: 3:00-5:00 pm
Location:
Union South (TITU)
Register online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_5vVZ8iVDoXZsPLT

First year students can be unaccustomed to the college environment, having just come from High School. Therefore, the ways that you engage and teach them in the classroom and lab have to be different than how you engage more senior undergraduates. In this hands-on workshop you will: (a) explore where 1st year students are developmentally, and the impact this can have on their learning, (b) uncover what they don’t know, as well as (c) discuss and experience teaching approaches and other supports they need to be successful and thrive in your classroom and on campus. This workshop is intended for graduate students and post-docs who will be TA-ing courses with first year undergraduates in the fall, or who expect to teach first year students sometime in the future.

Registration is required.

Workshop Materials:

PDF Workshop Packet

PDF Presentation

Introduction to Instructional Design Processes Workshop

Date: August 12, 2016

Time: 9:00 am- 12:00 pm

Location: Union South (TITU)

Facilitator: Cid Freitag (DoIT Academic Technology)

Registration is required online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0Op3m1qyZpvedM1

 

Learn strategies to plan and organize learning experiences for students to acquire and apply knowledge, and reflect on what they've learned. This workshop provides an opportunity to learn a ‘backward design’ process to help instructors plan assignments, activities, and assessments that align with course goals. Topics include:

  • writing strong, student-centered learning objectives that describe what you want students to know and be able to do.
  • using assessment as a tool for improving learning.
  • using learning objectives as a guide as you select content and design assessments, assignments, and learning activities.

In the workshop we’ll learn about effective practices from the literature, share ideas and discuss examples. You will have time to draft and discuss learning objectives, assessment ideas, and a sequence of students’ learning experiences for one of your course topics.
Bring a copy of your course syllabus, and ideas for a course topic you’d like to focus on. Refreshments will be provided!