Summer 2017 Workshops

The Delta Program hosts a variety of annual workshops to help participants with their professional development around teaching and learning. These workshops sometimes require registration so we can make sure we have enough materials. Everyone from graduate students to faculty is welcome to attend.

» Diversity Statement Workshop
» CAREER Award Workshop: Writing Your Research and Education Plan
» Creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP) Co-sponsored by the Graduate School Office of Professional Development
» Pulling It All Together: Crafting Your CV/Resume and Cover Letter
» Teaching Philosophy Workshop
» Designing Writing Activities to Solve Teaching and Learning Challenges in any STEM Course

Diversity Statement Workshop

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

9:00-11:00 am
Union South (TITU)

Facilitators: Don Gillian-Daniel, Delta Program

Registration closed.

 

This workshop is designed to help participants develop their diversity statement. This document is becoming a more common component of faculty job application materials, and yet can prove challenging to write. Through hands-on exercises and constructive peer feedback, participants will leave with material for a draft of their diversity statement. You do not need to have a prior draft of your statement in order to participate in the workshop.


CAREER Award Workshop: Writing Your Research and Education Plan

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Delta Program, WISCIENCE and WARF.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

8:30 - 10:30 am

H.F. DeLuca Forum, Discovery Building

Registration is required online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3W8Mqmjrouomq2h

 

The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program offers the foundation's most prestigious awards. It supports junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research. All CAREER proposals must have an integrated research and education plan at their core, and this workshop will help you think creatively about how your plan can reflect your own disciplinary and educational interests and goals, as well as the needs and context of your organization. During the workshop, you will discuss strategies for writing a successful education plan, listen to faculty who have submitted successful proposals as they share their tips and insights on the review process, and start drafting your proposal. The workshop is designed for new faculty preparing to submit proposals in all fields of science, engineering, and mathematics.

 

Workshop Materials:

» UW-Madison Resources for CAREER Proposal

PDF 2016 CAREER Workshop Materials Packet

PDF Integrating Broader Impacts into your Research Proposal

PDF Ahna Skop Presentation 2016

PDF Bulent Sarlioglu Presentation 2016

Library Resources

MRSEC and Broader Impacts 2016

Badger BOTS

» Mathieu RD, Pfund C, Gillian-Daniel DL.  2009.  Leveraging the NSF Broader Impacts criterion for change in STEM education. Change Magazine. 41(3):50-55   http://www.cirtl.net/bibliography/ag/M?sort=author&order=asc.

» National Alliance for Broader Impacts

» STEM Library Research Guide


Creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP)

Co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Graduate School Office of Professional Development and the Delta Program.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

10:00-11:30 am

159 Education Building

Registration is required online: http://bit.ly/2rrNvjU

 

An individual development plan (IDP) encourages you to think about what you need to do next – and over the next few years – to achieve your goals. We will discuss how to define achievable goals, identify resources, and develop strategies for implementing and sustaining your plans. Participants will begin creating a personalized plan, taking into account career interests and addressing the development of knowledge and skills for professional growth.


Pulling It All Together: Crafting Your CV/Resume and Cover Letter

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

8:30-10:00 am
Union South (TITU)

Registration is required online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_428yEVA2Dkkb6OV

 

In developing your written credentials and preparing application materials for your job search, it is crucial to represent your professional experience, accomplishments, expertise, and professional development experiences in the most impactful manner possible. Participants are asked to bring a hard copy of their CV/resume or a job application letter to this workshop. Join us and learn how to write your way into an interview!


Teaching Philosophy Workshop

Thursday, August 3, 2017

1:00-3:00 pm
Union South (TITU)

Facilitators: Jessica Maher, Delta Program

Registration is required online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9TAAzELHMUt4GEd

 

This workshop is designed to help participants develop their teaching philosophy. This document is a common component of faculty job application materials, and yet can prove challenging to write. Through hands-on exercises and constructive peer feedback, participants will leave with material for a draft of their teaching statement. You do not need to have a prior draft of your statement in order to participate in the workshop.


Designing Writing Activities to Solve Teaching and Learning Challenges in any STEM Course

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

9:00-11:30 am

Helen C. White Hall

Facilitator: Brad Hughes, Writing Center

Registration is required online: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0jFvoQV6WnzAj2t


Well-designed writing assignments can help students learn the subject matter of a course more deeply, increase students’ engagement with complex topics, and give course instructors valuable insight into what students understand—and what they don’t. But it can be difficult to design writing assignments that advance specific course goals and encourage students to take responsibility for their own learning. In this interactive workshop, we’ll share advice, examples, and best practices for using writing to its full potential in SBE and STEM courses. We’ll discuss research about interactive writing assignments that advance student learning; analyze effective examples of syllabi and assignments from a range of SBE and STEM courses at UW–Madison, including small seminars, large lecture courses, and labs; consider how writing can be used to both develop community in your classroom and to enter broader disciplinary communities; and discuss ways to design effective evaluation rubrics to give efficient feedback on writing assignments. Finally, you'll have a chance to draft and get feedback on a new writing assignment to use in your own teaching - now or in the future.