Workshops

The Delta Program hosts a variety of annual workshops to help participants with their professional development around teaching and learning. These workshops sometimes require registration so we can make sure we have enough materials. Everyone from graduate students to faculty is welcome to attend.

Teaching Portfolio Workshop Part I: Writing Your Teaching Philosophy
Teaching Portfolio Workshop Part II: Understanding, Designing, and Creating Your Teaching Portfolio

Pre-Internship Workshop
CAREER Award Workshop: Writing Your Research and Education Plan
Teaching with Writing in SBE and STEM Courses Workshop Part I: Designing Writing Assignments
Teaching with Writing in SBE and STEM Courses Workshop Part II: Using Feedback on Writing to Help Students Learn
Broader Impacts Workshop: How to Address the Broader Impact in Your Fellowship Application

Teaching Portfolio Workshop Part I: Writing Your Teaching Philosophy

When:This workshop will be offered again in Fall 2014

Where: TBD

 

The Delta Program offers a two-part workshop series each year, to help future faculty members create their teaching portfolios. The workshop will focus on developing a teaching philosophy, which is often a required piece of many faculty job applications. It is intended for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers from any discipline. Individuals with working philosophies, as well as those who have never developed one, are welcome to attend. The second part of the workshop (Teaching Portfolio Workshop Part II: Understanding, Designing, and Creating Your Teaching Portfolio), focuses on the broader teaching portfolio, and specifically, how to create one. Registration is required.

 

Supplemental Workshop Materials

Delta Teaching and Learning Portfolio Guidebook (PDF)
Example Portfolios

Teaching Portfolio Workshop Part II: Understanding, Designing, and Creating Your Teaching Portfolio

When:This workshop will be offered again in Fall 2014

Where:TBD

 

The Delta Program offers a two-part workshop series each year, to help future faculty members create their teaching portfolios. Part I focuses on writing a teaching and learning philosophy. In this second session, our focus is on the broader teaching portfolio, and specifically, how to create one. You will learn about the three elements of a teaching portfolio (teaching and learning philosophy, artifacts, and reflective statement), participate in hands-on learning activities and group discussions, see examples of successful teaching portfolios, and leave with draft materials for the artifact and reflective statement elements. Registration is required.


Workshop Materials

Delta Teaching and Learning Portfolio Guidebook (PDF)
Example Portfolios

Pre-Internship Workshop

The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers practical experience to develop their skills and interests in teaching and learning. Each semester, a diverse cohort of interns works with their faculty or staff mentor on a Teaching-As-Research project. This 2-part workshop series is intended to prepare students to engage in an internship project in the following semester. The 2nd workshop in the series is a required part of the internship. If you have any questions about the Delta Internship Program or the Pre-Internship Workshop, contact Don Gillian-Daniel at dldaniel@wisc.edu.

 

Pre-Internship Workshop: Finding a Project

When: Friday, May 2, 2014 8:30-9:30 am

Where: Union South (TITU)

Register online: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_5mr661tGj4ubk8J

Attendees will meet to discuss potential internship projects and partners. This session is for students who do not yet have a specific project or partner in mind. The Delta Internship Program gives graduate students and postdoctoral researchers practical experience to develop their skills and interests in teaching and learning. Each semester, a diverse cohort of interns works with their faculty or staff mentor on a teaching-as-research project. Registration is required.

 

Pre-Internship Workshop: Developing Your Project

When: Friday, May 16, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm

Where: Union South (TITU)

Register online: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_5mr661tGj4ubk8J

Attendees will define their internship project, develop their project plan, explore available resources, and learn more about the university's institutional review board (IRB) process that facilitates responsible research. This session is for students who do have a specific project and partner planned. Students preparing to complete their Delta internship project during the subsequent semester are required to attend this workshop. Workshop attendees should have already completed at least one semester-long Delta course and be intending to complete their internship project next semester. Registration is required.

Workshop Materials

Delta Internship Guidebook (PDF)


CAREER Award Workshop: Writing Your Research and Education Plan

Date: Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Time: 10:00am–12:00pm

Location: Tong Auditorium

 

The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program offers the foundation's most prestigious awards. It supports junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research. All CAREER proposals must have an integrated research and education plan at their core, and this Delta Program workshop will help you think creatively about how your plan can reflect your own disciplinary and educational interests and goals, as well as the needs and context of your organization. During the workshop, you will discuss strategies for writing a successful education plan, listen to faculty who have submitted successful proposals as they share their tips and insights on the review process, and start drafting your proposal. The workshop is designed for new faculty preparing to submit proposals in all fields of science, engineering, and mathematics.


Workshop Materials

2014 CAREER Workshop Materials Packet (PDF)

Trina McMahon Presentation (June 2014) (PPT)

MRSEC Presentation (PPTX)

BadgerBOTS Presentation (PPTX)

Institute for Biology Education Overview (PDF)

Mathieu RD, Pfund C, Gillian-Daniel DL.  2009.  Leveraging the NSF Broader Impacts criterion for change in STEM education. Change Magazine. 41(3):50-55   http://www.cirtl.net/bibliography/ag/M?sort=author&order=asc.


Teaching with Writing in SBE and STEM Courses Workshop Part I: Designing Writing Assignments to Help Students Learn

Date: Wednesday, June 18

Time: 9:00am–12:00pm

Location: Room 7191 Helen C. White Hall

Workshop leader: Brad Hughes (Director, The Writing Center & Writing Across the Curriculum)

REGISTER ONLINE: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0jG8KPugFuBUWGh

 

The Delta Program, in partnership with the L&S Program in Writing Across the Curriculum, is pleased to present a new two-part workshop series, titled "Writing Across the Curriculum: Teaching with Writing in SBE and STEM Courses." This first workshop addresses how to design effective writing assignments. Because writing plays a powerful role in helping students learn, assignments that use writing are important to course design. Yet it can be difficult to know how to design writing assignments that advance specific course goals and encourage students to take responsibility for their own learning. In this workshop, we’ll share advice, examples, and best practices for using writing to its full potential in SBE and STEM courses. To do so, we’ll discuss research about interactive, process-driven writing assignments that advance student learning; analyze effective examples of syllabi and assignments from a range of SBE and STEM courses at UW–Madison, including small seminars, large lecture courses, labs, and more; hear from faculty at UW–Madison about how they use both formal and informal writing to help students learn, discover, and generate knowledge; consider how writing can be used to both develop learning communities in your classroom and to help students enter broader disciplinary communities; discuss how to use writing assignments for teaching-as-research, including gauging student learning; and draft and get feedback on a new writing assignment to use in your own teaching.


Teaching with Writing in SBE and STEM Courses Workshop Part II: Using Feedback on Writing to Help Students Learn

Date: Tuesday, June 24

Time: 1:00–4:00pm

Location:Room 6191 Helen C. White Hall

Workshop leader: Brad Hughes (Director, The Writing Center & Writing Across the Curriculum)

REGISTER ONLINE: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0jG8KPugFuBUWGh

 

The Delta Program, in partnership with L&S Program in Writing Across the Curriculum, is pleased to present a new two-part workshop series titled, "Writing Across the Curriculum: Teaching with Writing in SBE and STEM Courses." The topic of this second workshop is how to use feedback on writing in courses to help students learn. When we give feedback to students on their writing, we have an opportunity for individualized and specific instruction. Yet giving feedback is time-consuming, and prioritizing what to give feedback on can be challenging. This workshop will focus on strategies and time-saving methods for motivating your students to deepen their thinking and analysis, no matter the size or structure of the course. To that end, we will look at current research about how feedback on writing can help students learn to enter a community of researchers and learners; practice and analyze different methods of responding to student writing in order to determine best practices for providing feedback effectively and efficiently; look at samples of faculty members’ writing feedback from a range of UW–Madison courses, including SBE and STEM courses, small seminars, large lecture courses, labs, and more; and critically consider different kinds of rubrics instructors can create to communicate their evaluation criteria for student papers.


Broader Impacts Workshop: How to Address the Broader Impact in Your Fellowship Application

When: This workshop will be offered again in October 2014

Where: TBD

Workshop leaders: TBD

Check back for information about this workshop in the fall.


The National Science Foundation (NSF) employs two criteria in the review of Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) applications, namely intellectual merit and broader impact. Experience shows that while most applicants have little difficulty responding to the criterion relating to intellectual merit, many struggle to frame the broader impacts of the activities they propose to undertake. To address the broader impacts, applications are expected to include ways in which activities and projects will advance discovery and understanding, broaden the participation of underrepresented groups, enhance the infrastructure for research and education, and ultimately benefit society. This workshop is designed to help you address the concept of broader impacts in your fellowship application, and specifically is a time for you to discuss strategies for writing a successful broader impact plan, hear from panelists about successful fellowship proposals, and learn about resources on campus focused on effective integration of research and education.

 

Workshop Materials

NSF Resources Handout 2013

Delta Broader Impacts Workshop Presentation (slides) Fall 2013 (PPT)

Delta Broader Impacts Workshop Packet Fall 2013 (PDF)

Delta Broader Impacts Workshop Delta Overview Presentation (slides) Fall 2013 (PPT)